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Send me an email with photos of your rifling bench, boring machine, or reamer and I’ll post them here.   If you’re hammering out a barrel, I’ll be happy to include that, too.  Please include a short write-up that tells what your photo(s) are all about….and use your real name and not some “mountain man” moniker like Possum Belly Joe or Old Griz as I want you to receive proper credit for your efforts and labors. 

 

     Note:  I reserve the right to limit the quantity, size, and content of the photos.   “Borrowed” photos from other websites or publications of any nature, are off limits and cannot be accepted. Please make sure you own the photos.

     Will Jones, who lives in England, built a small rifling bench for a pistol that he made.  All metal pieces of the pistol were fabricated from pattern welded steel.   Fabricate each and every part of a pistol by hand, rifle it on the bench you made, and assemble it makes you a gunsmith in my book.  Good job, Will!

 

 

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     The following shot is of Brother Jim Sichlau from Illinois and his rifling bench under construction.  I’ve seen it and it looks great.  Wish he’d send a photo of it completed.

 

 

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     Below is Mr. Mike Wiggins from Kentucky putting his modified Toad Hall style boring and reaming machine through it’s paces.  Mike is like me.  He took what he had on hand and made something from it…..and it works!  He was clever and rigged up a weight system to help him out while he works one man fashion.  Added an old treadle sewing machine, too.  I enjoy seeing what guys from the Land of Make-do accomplish.  The second shot is an overall view.

 

 

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Here again, is the photo of Bob Patrick’s hand made pattern welded pistol barrel.  This was a labor of love and I thought it ought to be included on a more permanent basis.  

 

SIMPLY BEAUTIFUL!!

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Andy Thomas is one talented guy and I fortunate to call him friend.  He’s also ye “bare foot” gunsmith at historic Manskers Station, located near the famous Cumberland Gap.  It’s a living history museum focusing on the 1770s era. Andy has built a terrific looking version of my bench and here’s a photo of it.  Sure looks like it fits right in and lends itself to the atmosphere to me. Good job, Andy!  Check out the rifling in the barrel he has in the shop and find out yourself his bench is not just a “wall hanger” for the tourists.